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Strategic Vacuums Resulting from U.S. Retreat


Geopolitics – like nature – abhors a vacuum. History is replete with examples that demonstrate how the rapid depressurization of a power pulling out from a region too quickly or too soon can lead to instability in the form of civil wars, military coups, or genocide. U.S. disengagement from key areas of Eurasia would create a strategic vacuum portending systemic and regional instability that would undermine the post-World War II international architecture. Join us for a discussion on how opportunist contenders for great power status, such as Russia and China, or even intermediate powers such as Turkey and Iran, will exploit a U.S. retreat as a strategic opportunity to bolster themselves.

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