Why democracy in Myanmar was so easily crushed

Why democracy in Myanmar was so easily crushed

Once again, Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar’s most famous citizen, finds herself under arrest.

History rhymes, but it never repeats itself exactly. This time around, in the wake of a Feb. 1 military coup that toppled the Nobel Peace Prize laureate from power, things are rather different from how they were the last time she was under arrest.

The world outside her country no longer sees Aung San Suu Kyi as the hero of democracy and human rights we once believed her to be, and few will campaign for her release with the energy and zeal with which they did in the past. And while she remains popular in Myanmar itself, that popularity remains unlikely to translate into the reversal of the coup.

Read the full article at the Washington Post.

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